Peter Murray

 

The latest edition (number 471) of the Journal of the London Society goes to print this week and will be posted out to members within the next fortnight.

If you want to receive your copy, join the Society today. Individual memberships are just £25, students pay just £15 and there are special rates for dual/family memberships and for businesses.

There’s a ‘conservation’ theme to Journal 471, with Peter Murray’s interview with Marcus Binney, founder of SAVE; our guide to eight of the best Conservation Areas; Frank Kelsall reflects on 50 years of the Civic Amenities Act; Tom Coward & Geoff Shearcroft of AOC Architecture explain why historic buildings should be brought back into the community; Emily Gee of Historic England calls for a new heritage strategy; Heather Cheesebrough says that conservation areas are over-zealously policed.

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Peter Murray

 

London Society members are warmly invited to attend The Literary London Society’s annual conference, which will be held on the 13-14th July 2017 at Senate House. This year’s theme is ‘Fantastic London: Dream, Speculation and Nightmare’. Plenary speakers are as follows:

  • Darran Anderson (author of Imaginary Cities) – After London: What Apocalyptic Visions Tell Us about the City, from the Medieval to the Modern
  • Dr Caroline Edwards (Birkbeck) – Armchair Apocalypse, or, Why Destroying London in Speculative Literature is So Enjoyable
  • Prof Rohan McWilliam (Anglia Ruskin) – The Cultural Work of the Victorian West End of London

Conference attendees will also have exclusive access to the ‘Talking Orwell’ installation, organised by The Bartlett Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis (UCL).

For additional promotional information and details of how to register please click here.

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Peter Murray

 

This year’s AGM will be held on Monday 26 June starting promptly at 6:30pm.

As with last year, the meeting will be held at the offices of Allies + Morrison, 85 Southwark St, London SE1 0HX.

All members of the Society are able to attend and to vote. It would be appreciated if you could register if you plan to attend so that we have an idea of the numbers.

If you have a motion that you would like to be debated at the AGM, or would like to put yourself up for election as a trustee, please email director@londonsociety.org.uk

Motions and nominations must be received before midnight on 4 June so that they can be circulated to members. (Any amendments to the Society constitution have to be received before 28 May.)

The agenda, list of nominations and other paperwork will be emailed to members before the meeting.

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Peter Murray

how to read london

How to Read London: A crash course in London architecture

by Chris Rogers

Reviewed by Don Brown

Available from the London Society Book Service in association with John Sandoe Bookshop

This rather wonderful little book looks at some 100 buildings in London from the 17th century to the 21st and, with short, pertinent text and photos, sketches and drawings of details, explains the architectural significance of each, and how they fit into the building heritage of the capital.

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Peter Murray

 

Passions run high on all sides in discussions about the future of the Green Belt, but this often produces more heat than light. This London Society Debate: A Better Green Belt? Making the Green Belt fit for the 21st Century brought together five speakers with differing views to give their opinions on what, if anything, should be done: Richard Knox Johnston, London Green Belt Council; Richard Upton, Deputy Chief Executive U+I plc; Merrick Denton-Thompson, the Landscape Institute; John Myers, London YIMBY and Alice Roberts of the CPRE. Paul Finch of Architects’ Journal chaired the discussion, and Saul Collyns reports.

Paul Finch of architects' journalThe green belt tends to provoke passionate debate amongst Londoners, and this was no less true at the London Society debate. Nevertheless, ever keen to move discussions forward (London Society played an instrumental role advocating for its creation in the 1930s), this event aimed to move beyond binary discussions with speakers characterised as ‘for’ or ‘against’, to explore how it can be made fit for the 21st century.

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