Peter Murray

 

In May and June the Society ran a series of five Saturday morning talks in the Building Centre in central London.

The series was designed to give non-professionals an overview on the evolution of the capital’s architecture, and we were fortunate to be able to call upon several knowledgable speakers: Alex Forshaw on medieval London; Dr Geoffrey Tyack on the Georgian city; Susie Barson on Victorian developments; Alan Powers on the city between the wars; and Chris Rogers on the contemporary city.

Each of the five talks had over 80 attendees, so it seems that we have tapped into something that is of great interest to both members and non-members and we’re currently looking at future series – there will certainly be something this autumn and we will develop the architecture theme in 2018.

The illustrations used by each of the speakers can be found here. For future courses we will look to publishing the information in some form.

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Peter Murray

 

The Spring/Summer edition of the Journal of the London Society is now available.

Members should receive their copy this week.

Non-members can get a free copy by joining the Society (details here) or buy a copy at the sale price of just £5 here.

This issue marks 50 years since the 1967 Civic Amenities Act created the first official ‘conservation areas’ as a way of acknowledging the overall character of an area, rather than the merits of individual buildings. There are now more than 1,000 conservation areas in London alone, ranging from elegant Georgian squares and Art Deco housing estates, to places valued more for their community than their architecture, such as the Walworth Road.

London certainly has much worth cherishing – physically and culturally – but we cannot preserve the urban in aspic. Cities are living breathing organisms, they must grow, adapt and evolve. So how do we marry the concept of conservation with the need for continual change? Who chooses what stays and what goes, and according to what criteria? How do we use the best of the past and present to create a meaningful future? The Journal therefore both celebrates some of London’s most attractive conservation areas and hard-fought battles with the bulldozer, but interrogates the concept of conservation itself.

UNTIL 22 JULY YOU CAN BUY A COPY OF THE JOURNAL FOR £2.50 OFF THE USUAL PRICE. CLICK HERE TO FIND OUT MORE

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Peter Murray

Join us to celebrate summer in style with food and drink at Oasis Farm, an urban farm tucked away in the heart of Waterloo just moments from the Southbank, and the closest farm to Parliament!

Opening in May 2015, Oasis has transformed a strip of wasteland into a flourishing community resource and a haven for nature, where the aim is to learn how to care for ourselves, others, plants, animals and the environment. Oasis’ vision is to provide a safe, supportive and inspiring space for the community the themes of food and farming are used to help people feel more connected, empowered and to reach their full potential.

Tickets for members and their guests cost just £25 and are available here. Non members tickets will be on sale from 13 June.

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Peter Murray

 

The latest edition (number 471) of the Journal of the London Society goes to print this week and will be posted out to members within the next fortnight.

If you want to receive your copy, join the Society today. Individual memberships are just £25, students pay just £15 and there are special rates for dual/family memberships and for businesses.

There’s a ‘conservation’ theme to Journal 471, with Peter Murray’s interview with Marcus Binney, founder of SAVE; our guide to eight of the best Conservation Areas; Frank Kelsall reflects on 50 years of the Civic Amenities Act; Tom Coward & Geoff Shearcroft of AOC Architecture explain why historic buildings should be brought back into the community; Emily Gee of Historic England calls for a new heritage strategy; Heather Cheesebrough says that conservation areas are over-zealously policed.

Read More…

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Peter Murray

 

London Society members are warmly invited to attend The Literary London Society’s annual conference, which will be held on the 13-14th July 2017 at Senate House. This year’s theme is ‘Fantastic London: Dream, Speculation and Nightmare’. Plenary speakers are as follows:

  • Darran Anderson (author of Imaginary Cities) – After London: What Apocalyptic Visions Tell Us about the City, from the Medieval to the Modern
  • Dr Caroline Edwards (Birkbeck) – Armchair Apocalypse, or, Why Destroying London in Speculative Literature is So Enjoyable
  • Prof Rohan McWilliam (Anglia Ruskin) – The Cultural Work of the Victorian West End of London

Conference attendees will also have exclusive access to the ‘Talking Orwell’ installation, organised by The Bartlett Centre for Advanced Spatial Analysis (UCL).

For additional promotional information and details of how to register please click here.

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