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Peter Murray

RIBA is hosting an evening of “attempted stand-up comedy” with MC Steve Cross, to raise money for the RIBA Student Hardship Fund which helps to make architecture accessible to all.

Called How Did It End Up Like That?, the evening features a line-up of experts from across the world of architecture, from creators of iconic buildings, to people who train new architects and historians who try to understand how we ended up with the buildings and cities we have now.

It promises to be a night of learning cunningly disguised as a hilarious evening out! Tickets are available here,

Increasing numbers of architecture students are facing financial hardship continuing their studies. The RIBA provides grants to those students most in need through our Student Hardship Fund. The purposes of the RIBA Student Hardship Funds are to:

  • Alleviate financial hardship of students of architecture
  • Assist students financially in gaining professional experience
  • Widen participation in architectural education
  • Reduce student drop-out rates

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Peter Murray

yiddish twist orchestra

2016 marks the 150th anniversary for the English Heritage Blue Plaque scheme which famously helps to connect the greats from the past with the buildings of the present. To celebrate this long-running scheme, the London Society begins a campaign launch to increase the number of Blue Plaques secured, particularly for those from the folk and jazz genre. To mark the launch, the society will promote two fantastic gala concerts to highlight the contribution that such musicians continue to make to the cultural life of London.

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Peter Murray

 

Last month, London Society members had an exclusive tour of the Globe’s Jacobean theatre, the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse. Project Architect, Oliver Heywood of Allies and Morrison explained the challenges of authentically constructing an archetypal indoor Jacobean theatre within a shell built in the mid 1990s. Abi Spooner reports on the visit:

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Backstage theatre tours are always fascinating, and this was one with a difference. Oliver Heywood of Allies and Morrison, who led the project to build a Jacobean theatre, delivered so many fascinating angles way beyond the theatrical.

When the reconstructed Globe was built at the end of the last century, architects allowed for an indoor theatre according to Inigo Jones’s plans. It turned out, when this project started years later, that these original plans were actually designed by John Webb, his protege in 1668 – not a Jacobean! Each different element of the playhouse is based on architecture of the period – the arcades from the Bodleian, a Scottish painted ceiling destroyed by fire, and the shape of the Sheldonian Theatre in Oxford.

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