Currently showing blog posts for: talks Archives - . Go BACK to view all posts.
Peter Murray

 

Members are the lifeblood of the London Society, helping fund our events, publications and the work we do with the All-Party Parliamentary Group.

More than that, the engaged membership that we have gets involved in the talks and debates we hold, comes on the tours and walks, and contributes to the discussion on the sort of capital city that we want.

If you’re interested in making London a better place in which to live and to work, want to know more about the city’s history and development, enjoy seeing ‘behind the scenes’ at famous buildings and architects’ practices, then you really need to become a member.

And this is the best time at which to join. In the New Year, membership rates increase, so if you join now, you can save up to £10 off.

The spring 2018 events programme is taking shape (you can download the current list here) with booking open to members for several events.

Many of our events sold out in 2017, so if you want to make sure that you don’t miss a talk or tour that you’re really interested in, then becoming a member gives you priority booking as well as discounted tickets.

We have nearly 1,000 individual members now and hope to get this to 1,500 next year. Join today and you’ll be part of a growing society that is educating, informing and entertaining its members. Click here for more information.

Leave a Reply

Peter Murray

 

We’re delighted that this year’s pre-Christmas talk will be given by Matt Brown, editor-at-large of the Londonist website and author of (among many other books) “Everything you know about London is Wrong“.

Matt will share stories from some of the most intriguing of his perambulations around the capital. Find out what happens behind the lights of Piccadilly Circus; how to stand on the weather vane of St Bride’s; the secret rooms and relics of St Paul’s; and how to dress yourself in the morning when your day includes a trip down the Northern Outfall Sewer AND the press launch of a new sherry bar.

And there’ll be myths shattered, legends overturned and long-held “facts” disproved as Matt shares gems from Everything you know about London is Wrong.

Matt’s book makes an ideal stocking-filler – we’ll have some to purchase at the event – and we round off the evening in traditional style, with mince pies, drinks and other festive goodies.

I hope you can join us – tickets are available here.

Leave a Reply

Peter Murray

 

As part of the Society’s London Icons series, Emily Gee, Historic England’s London Planning Director, looked at the historic context of building tall in London – Finbar Bradley reports:

In recent times the structures that most people would perceive as iconic have tended to be London’s new breed of tall buildings. On Thursday night and firmly with our feet on the ground at Cowcross Street, the London Society heard a dynamic “short history of London” from the 1600’s until the present. Emily Gee of Historic England took people on a journey from the disasters which brought about planning reform, through the backlash of early attempts to create tall buildings and to future possibilities.

Read More…

Leave a Reply

Peter Murray

 

London’s road infrastructure is essentially finite and the priorities for its use continue to change. Autonomous vehicles are a potential game changer in this sphere and the GATEway project in Greenwich is one of several gathering information on how they might interact with pedestrians and other road users.

The London Society has been involved with the Greater London Region (GLR) of the Institution of Mechanical Engineers (IMechE) on two previous occasions through presentations under the theme of Sustainable Urban Mobility, and the South-Western Area of IMechE GLR is pleased to offer a warm invitation to London Society members to attend the latest in the series at Kingston University on 21 March at 18.30 for 19.00 to 20.00.

Prof Nick Reed, Academy Director at TRL and GATEway Technical Lead will describe the objectives of the project and what has been learned so far. The event is co-sponsored by the Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport (CILT) and is free to members of all three organisations. Please book as a guest through the IMechE website

 

Leave a Reply

Peter Murray

Craft and materiality maintain their allure in architecture, despite the global age and rise of digital design. Practitioners Henry Squire, Roz Barr and Anthony Thistleton described three recent projects in London in which handcrafted elements or overt materiality play a large role, and London Society committee member, Susan Holder (ex Crafts Council) chaired the discussion on the enduring appeal of craft in architecture and how it contributes to London’s architectural character.

Read More…

Leave a Reply

Peter Murray

 

LS | BatterseaOn 20 September London Society members gathered to learn about the Battersea Power Station development and how its story fits with that of Nine Elms and London as a whole. Owen Hatherley (A Guide to the New Ruins of Great Britain, The Ministry of Nostalgia) and Peter Watts (Up in Smoke: The Failed Dreams of Battersea Power Station) talked us through its history, asking how its redevelopment will change Nine Elms, and the extent to which it is indicative of the play between property, power and politics in London today. Saul Collyns reports.

Watts’ motivation to delve deeper into the story of Battersea Power Station arose from a curiosity shared by many Londoners: Why had the numerous developments announced, seemingly on a two year cycle, never materialised, and what was going wrong?

Battersea Power Station, child of architect Giles Gilbert Scott (also known for structures such as Liverpool Cathedral and Waterloo Bridge), fully opened in 1935. According to Watts, its construction was more controversial than the Garden Bridge, with opponents including the Archbishop of Canterbury and the King. Throughout the 1960s it was notoriously known as a ‘polluting monster’, impregnating the surrounding area with sulphur smoke, the smell of which deterred locals from adjacent Battersea Park. Nevertheless, by the 1970s the power station had gained popularity, becoming the face of a ‘real’ and ‘authentic’ London, even appearing on the front cover of Pink Floyd’s album Animals.

Read More…

Leave a Reply

Peter Murray

 

imgres

On Tuesday 18th October, Sherin Aminossehe, Chief Operating Officer, Head of Government Property Profession, Government Property Unit has kindly agreed to talk on the subject of: ‘It’s all about numbers: The Government Estate Strategy’, followed by a panel discussion with:

  • Simon Allan, Real Estate Partner, Berwin Leighton Paisner
  • Adam Dakin, Joint Managing director, Telereal Trillium, and
  • Geoff Robson, Director Asset Strategy & Portfolio, Ministry of Defence

Registration and refreshments from 8.00 am; the talk will begin at 8.30 am.

This breakfast talk and discussion is organised by the Architecture, Planning, Engineering and Construction Forum of the Cambridge University Land Society and is kindly being hosted by Berwin Leighton Paisner in their offices at Adelaide House, London Bridge, EC4R 9HA.

You can find further details and book tickets here (use the ‘London Society Price‘ link for buying tickets)

Leave a Reply

Peter Murray

 

The autumn programme of Society talks, tours, lectures and debates is coming together, and some of the latest additions are below. For the complete list and to book, visit www.londonsociety.org.uk/events 

Please note that several events have already sold out, so to keep up to date with what the Society is organising, sign up to our email newsletterYou can also keep up to date with our schedule via Twitter (@LondonSoc) and Facebook.

You can download this list of forthcoming events here.

Read More…

Leave a Reply