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Peter Murray

 

The All-Party Parliamentary Group on London’s Planning and Built Environment met on 31 October. David Taylor, editor of the NLA’s New London Quarterly, reports.

© BAR Productions Joe Howard

London must patch up its relationship with the public over so-called affordable housing by defining its parameters more realistically. But City Hall is aiming to help address quality and the housing shortfall across the capital through more intervention over land assembly, a commitment to tackling supply with new methods of construction across many tenures and a new name-and-shame database on rogue landlords.

Those were some of the key issues to emerge from the recent meeting of the APPG for London’s Planning and Built Environment at Portcullis House.

Chair Rupa Huq, MP for Ealing Central and Acton, introduced the session on how we can deliver genuine high quality homes for Londoners and address a crisis over affordable provision.

Deputy mayor for housing and residential development James Murray said that there had been ‘remarkably few’ opportunities to tighten up the speed of getting the new draft London Plan into place, but that it is expected on 29 November. The story of London over the last two decades, though, was of a 40% increase in jobs, 25% climb in population and 15% in housing supply. ‘It has been a story of jobs and economic success, but housing failure’, he said. ‘It simply hasn’t kept up with demand’. There is an ‘affordability gulf’ in what we are building, and although traditional housebuilders have a large role to play they tend to focus on the high-end homes for sale. London needs some 66,000 homes a year, according to new GLA figures, with 2/3 of them having to be affordable.

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Peter Murray

 

From our fascination with housing design to the impact of advances in domestic technology, the Twentieth Century Society’s autumn London lecture series will explore the way our built heritage has evolved over the last 100 years.

Focussing on what makes the C20 house so different, so special from what came before, the ‘Design for Living: The C20 House’ lecture series celebrates the publication of the C20 Society’s new book 100 Houses 100 Years, to which all the speakers contributed.

The lectures will be held at the Gallery, 70 Cowcross Street, London EC1M 6EJ, on Thursday evenings at 6.30pm. Tickets can be booked via the Twentieth Century’s website www.c20society.org.uk/events and cost £8.00 for C20 Society members, £10 non members, £5 students (includes a glass of wine). 

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Peter Murray


A new ‘pass-it-on pamphlet’ which seeks to raise awareness of London’s housing crisis and possible solutions has just been launched, which you can read above. 2000 copies of the HOUSE ME LONDON are being distributed to generate public discussion and stimulate a social media campaign around the city’s housing crisis.

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Peter Murray

 

Intrigued by a group called “London YIMBY” – “yes, in my back yard”, we asked them to write a little about their organisation and what they’re trying to achieve. You can read more on their website.  And if you have any thoughts, please comment below.

London YIMBY logoLondon YIMBY is a campaign to make homes more affordable and secure across the UK by getting more attractive housing built with the support of local people.

The housing crisis is the biggest cause of inequality and lost opportunities.

Shockingly, it’s also caused more damage to UK GDP than anything since the Black Death of 1348-49. (We explain more on our website: londonyimby.org)

The great news is that there are many ways to get local residents’ support to build more homes and make areas more liveable and more beautiful. It’s all about how you ask the question.

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Peter Murray

 

cubwvinweaeuatkOn the 20th October, the London Society launches its new White Paper, Re/Shaping London written by Jonathan Manns and Dr Nicholas Falk.

Join us for the launch (published in connection with the All Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) for London’s Planning and Built Environment). As well as the presentation by the Paper’s authors, there will be discussion from Colin Wilson (Senior Manager, GLA), Max Farrell (Farrells & West London Business’ Commission for the Built Environment) and Rupa Huq (MP for Ealing Central and Acton). You can register here for tickets.

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Peter Murray

Lucian Smithers – Pocket’s Director of Marketing and Sales, and Russ Edwards, Head of Design, outlined ways in which Pocket hopes to address London’s ongoing housing crisis.

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Peter Murray

 

by Ben Derbyshire

In its second White Paper, The London Society urges a Royal Commission be set up to explore options to devolve more powers to the Mayor of London and the Greater London Authority to tackle the housing crisis, including forging greater co-operation across London and its neighbouring counties.

You can read the report on screen below, or to download the full PDF use the button below:
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A limited number of printed copies are available for £10 each (post free). Please click here to purchase (please allow 21 days for delivery)

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Peter Murray

 

The London Society debated the subject of estate regeneration on 23 June. Four architectural practices brought their long experience of housing to address the question: HTA Design LLP, Levitt Bernstein, Pollard Thomas & Edwards, and PRP. Saul Colyns reports.

As Londoners we live in a city of constant change, yet we retain a strong sense of and longing for community. This was reflected in the theme of this year’s London Festival of Architecture, with many of the events questioning how architecture shapes communities. It was therefore especially pertinent timing to explore estate regeneration and its impact upon communities at this talk.

Altered Estates‘, a report born out of collaboration between Levitt Bernstein, HTA Design, PRP Architects and Pollard Thomas Edwards, who have over 200 years of collective experience working on housing between them, offers recommendations on how to reconcile competing interests in estate regeneration.

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Peter Murray

Thursday, 23 June, 6:30 – 8:30
Altered Estates: how to reconcile competing interests in estate regeneration
Roberts and Sykes’ definition of regeneration cites the quest for ‘lasting improvements’ of neighbourhoods that have failed to attract investment on their own account.  We reflect on the political nature of this question as there are a range of possible motivations for seeking change.  When it comes to estate regeneration in particular, we have seen quiet a variety, including the elimination of poverty (Cameron), the rescue of forgotten communities (Blair), and the supply of new homes (Adonis, Heseltine et al).

 

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