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Peter Murray

This year’s Banister Fletcher lecture was given by Loyd Grossman CBE – Zoe Green reports.

Loyd Grossman has made a considerable contribution to civil society and is perhaps best known as the host of shows such as ‘Through the Keyhole’ and ‘Masterchef’ and for his own range of cooking sauces.

Beyond this, Grossman has had a lifelong interest in history, the arts and heritage, where he has served on the boards of a number of notable cultural institutions, including English Heritage, the Museums and Galleries Commission and the Public Monuments and Sculpture Association.

The evening event provided the opportunity to gain an insight into Grossman’s role as the first chairman of ‘The Royal Parks’ charity. The lecture took place at the St Marylebone Parish Church, which is just a stone’s throw away from Regent’s Park, one of the eight Royal Parks.

The Value of the Royal Parks

Every single person in the room has been to the Royal Parks – once a year, once a month or some of you may use them almost everyday. With around 7.7 million visits a year, the Royal Parks are very different other cultural assets / institutions. The Royal Parks are essential to our wellbeing and should be considered ‘one ofLondon’s single greatest assets’

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Peter Murray

 

London has the greatest collection of urban parks in the world. They are the city’s ‘lungs’, a place of tranquility in an increasingly frenetic metropolis and a haven for all sorts of wildlife.

But from the arrival of new plant diseases to the sheer weight of visitors (77 million a year, and growing), these superb open spaces face many challenges, as Loyd Grossman CBE, first Chairman of the Royal Parks will explain in this year’s Banister Fletcher lecture on 17 October.

The eight Royal Parks stretching from Bushy in the West to Greenwich in the East are amongst London’s greatest and most distinctive assets and now under the management of an independent charity on behalf of the nation.

In a society which fetishises selfishness and disdains the communal, the defence of the public realm is more important than ever. Loyd will explain the value the Parks give to the capital, the challenges they face, how different users’ needs are balanced, and how these historic spaces can continue to be a resource for Londoners in the future.

The Banister Fletcher lecture is free to members of the London Society, and £14 for non-members. Tickets are available here.

 

Loyd Grossman CBE, is the first Chairman of The Royal Parks. He is also a patron of the Association for Heritage Interpretation and Heritage Open Days, President of the National Association of Decorative and Fine Arts Societies (NADFAS) and Chairman of the Heritage Alliance.

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Peter Murray

 

On 8 November around 300 members and non-members of the Society came together in St Marylebone Parish Church to hear Sir Terry Farrell give this year’s Sir Banister Fletcher Lecture which he called “Shaping London”. Saul Collyns reports.

cwwxrnxw8aakfbyIn the 2016 Sir Banister Fletcher Memorial Lecture,renowned architect and urban planner Sir Terry Farrell, set out a fascinating viewpoint of London that revealed new connections between London’s past, present and future.

Farrell began by underlining the importance of ‘place as client’ as the guiding principle of his work. He believes in examining what a place aspires to be, separating it from any client base in order to fully understand its intricacies.

Farrell’s place-based approach has compelled him to study the different factors that have shaped London’s development, and he captivated us with some of his findings. London has grown organically, with much of its geography dictated by the River Thames. A fascination with the river’s bends led Farrell to realise that it was always deeper on the outside bend, with a build up of silt on the inner bend. As the city grew, large settlements such as Kingston and Richmond were built on the outer bends, which are easily navigable by boat, whereas parks or areas of low land value are located on the inner bends (notably the city’s numerous docks). A lack of river crossings in east London has also impeded connectivity and thus development. No flat-level bridges (which Farrell considers to be a crucial component of city making) cross the Thames downstream of Tower Bridge, so Farrell recently proposed a plan for 8 new low-rise bridges to the east, which would provide much needed connectivity to support more housing development.

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Peter Murray

 

Yesterday evening around 300 members and non-members of the Society packed into St Marylebone Parish Church to hear Sir Terry Farrell give the annual Sir Banister Fletcher lecture.

There’ll be a full write-up in due course, but the slides from the presentation are available below.

 

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Peter Murray

LS | SirTerryFarrell_©RichardGleed vII

Non-members can now buy tickets to hear Sir Terry Farrell give the annual Banister Fletcher lecture – and if you register before 1 September you will save £4.00 off the regular price.

For the rest of this month, ‘early bird’ tickets are available for just £10 (that includes the drinks reception after the talk).

Setting out a new and dynamic viewpoint on London, Sir Terry will join the dots and reveal new connections between London’s past, present and future, exploring how the capital’s complex shape has evolved over time, and also reflecting on current pressures on the city and its built environment.

Those of you who have heard Sir Terry before, will know that it will be an intelligently argued and entertainingly delivered talk.

To get your early bird tickets, go to our secure site here. The talk takes place on the evening of 8 November, in St Marylebone Parish Church, NW1 (location map here).

(However, the best deal is to join the London Society, because then you can get a ticket for the lecture completely free. Click here to see the membership options.)

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Peter Murray

 

b9f7ade8-31b2-4af6-82c6-38112171ff08Setting out a new and dynamic viewpoint on London, in this year’s Banister Fletcher lecture renowned architect and urban planner Sir Terry Farrell will join up the dots and reveal new connections between London’s past, present and future.

Looking beyond the contribution of individual buildings to the city, Sir Terry will explore on a larger canvas how the capital’s complex shape has evolved over time, and also reflect on current pressures on the city and its built environment.

The debate will take place on 8 November. Tickets are free to London Society members (you can find details of how to join the Society here).

TICKETS NOW AVAILABLE – CLICK HERE

 

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