Currently showing blog posts for: February 2018 - . Go BACK to view all posts.
Peter Murray

 

Until Thursday 1 March you can catch a free exhibition at Surrey Quays Shopping Centre, commissioned by British Land, celebrating some of the rich heritage of Canada Water, Rotherhithe and Surrey Docks.

The landscape and history of this neighbourhood have been shaped over the centuries by water. Once low-lying marshland, this riverside location became a globally important commercial and maritime hub, with links to every part of the world.

Curated with the help of local people and organisations, the exhibition highlights some of the key episodes in the history and heritage of this unique riverside and waterside community – with striking historic images, snapshots in time of places and personalities, and personal memories and voices of local people.

British Land, who is working in partnership with Southwark Council to develop plans for a new town centre at Canada Water known as the Canada Water Masterplan, recognises that the history and heritage of the local area have shaped the place we know today, and should continue to inform its future. It commissioned this exhibition, with the generous support of local people and organisations, and especially a local advisory group to provide input, to be able to bring together and celebrate some of it in one place.

You can find more details of the exhibition and other events taking place here

Leave a Reply

Peter Murray

 

Big Capital. Who is London for?

by Anna Minton

Reviewed by Darryl Chen

Available from John Sandoe Books

Anna Minton is angry. From government policy to foreign investment, from property professionals to shady landlords, from greedy developer to greedy local council, a spectrum of forces has created the crisis in which we now find ourselves, where housing has gone from being a human right to a financial product. Big Capital sets out the complexity of its shape and causes, however trades balanced argument for polemic in a litany against the ills of regeneration.

Read More…

Leave a Reply

Peter Murray

 

On Tuesday 23rd January Eric Reynolds of Urban Space Management spoke at Allies + Morrison’s offices on the history of the capital’s markets, providing an insight into what is involved in the regeneration of these spaces with case studies of his personal experience. Hannah Smith reports.

Eric provided a brief history of some of the largest London markets, with interesting facts dating back hundreds of years, a more recent fact was that 250,000 turkeys were sold by one wholesaler at Leadenhall market in the 1930’s! Also, interestingly, the original specification that there had to be six or more people gathered together for a space to be classed as a market, they are places we take for granted, where we meet and bond, browse and buy.

Read More…

Leave a Reply

Peter Murray

The Society’s recent sold-out walk with Blue Badge Guide Angela Morgan visited the rejuvenated markets of Spitalfields, Brick Lane and over to the foodies’ paradise of Borough Market. Hannah Murphy went along.

“It was market-morning. The ground was covered, nearly ankle-deep, with filth and mire; a thick steam, perpetually rising from the reeking bodies of the cattle, and mingling with the fog, which seemed to rest upon the chimney-tops, hung heavily above… Countrymen, butchers, drovers, hawkers, boys, thieves, idlers, and vagabonds of every low-grade, were mingled together in a mass…” (Oliver Twist)

On Saturday 27th January, we gathered around the Goat Statue in Bishop’s Square, Spitalfields, to learn about the significant role that street markets have played throughout London’s history. Our tour guide, Angela Morgan, quickly explained that just as a goat climbs a mountain with grit and perseverance, the residents and stall holders of Spitalfields have had to fight to remain culturally relevant in a society that is constantly changing. We discussed rapidly rising business rates and rents, which were pushing SME’s out of the area in search of more affordable rents.

Read More…

Leave a Reply

Peter Murray

 

The debate with the London Historians on the topic of Architectural Marmite will be a lively one, with strongly held preferences voiced with passionate rhetoric. It will be fun but also raise serious issues that engage with our other key topic of the current programme – the draft London Plan. In order to cater for the expected population of 10 million by 2030 London is going to have to build a massive 66,000 new homes a year – impacting on many people’s back yards. The Plan calls for high quality design, but many Londoners will wonder quite what that means. Sarah Weir Director of the Design Council says that “Good design is about more than aesthetics. It is about delivering for its users, and for everyone affected by it.”

Read More…

Leave a Reply

Peter Murray

 

One of the strands of talks and events that the Society is holding this year is on London Icons. Here Matt Brown, the curator of the strand, explains what he’s setting out to achieve.

Is there another city on the planet with as many icons as London? We have architectural icons, like Tower Bridge, Wembley Arch, the dome of St Paul’s and (the tower popularly known as) Big Ben.

Numerous inhabitants — real and fictional — instantly remind us of London whenever we hear their names: Charles Dickens, Queen Victoria, Sherlock Holmes, Mary Poppins, Peter Pan… We have iconic double-deckers and iconic black cabs. Our iconic phone boxes and post boxes are found all over the country but are particularly associated with London. Where else in the world will tourists pose beside street furniture?

Read More…

Leave a Reply