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Peter Murray

 

Those of you who have been a little slow in booking tickets for our forthcoming events are going to be disappointed.

All the places have gone for Behind the Scenes Tour of the Beaumont Hotel, the ‘House Me London’ debate, the talk by Nick Searl of Argent about King’s Cross, and Matt Brown’s ‘Discovering Secret London’ entertainment.

Sarah Gaventa’s Illuminated River‘ talk has only four places left, and our December walk around King’s Cross is already nearly half full.

What this shows is that if you’re not a member of the Society – and so get priority booking for our events – you could well miss out.

We’re working on our 2018 events programme right now and have some exceptionally good talks, walks, tours, debates and lectures planned. We’ll be looking at London markets and London AS a market, there’ll be more Great Estates talks and tours, a series on 1930s architecture, an in depth look at how we plan for London’s expansion over the next decade, and more London Icons. We’ll also be going behind the scenes at architects’ practices to meet the principals and hear about their major projects, have some exclusive tours of notable buildings, and plan to have a walk a month, to discover different areas of the capital.

If you don’t want to miss your opportunity to book these when the first tickets go on sale later this month (and some of them will be members-only events), you had better become a member now. And with membership rates increasing from January 1, you’ll also save money if you join today.

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Peter Murray

 

The second in our series of ‘Planning School’ talks was held on 28 October at the Building Centre in Store Street (in association with the Building Environment Trust), with Dr Paul Watt of Birkbeck talking about Social/Affordable Housing in London. Ian R Morrison was in the audience.

A fascinating talk on social housing in London with research that Dr Watt has been doing on estates, illustrated with slides and statistics.

Social housing is allocated on the basis of need, rather than demand and price (market forces). Its alternatives are the private rented sector and owner occupation. Provision varies between countries. At around 20%, the UK is higher than in the U.S., but not as high as other countries in Europe. Its prevalence is determined by political choices, for example social democrat traditions in parts of Europe.

Affordable housing is promoted to help solve the ‘housing crisis’, particularly in London. But affordable can take a number of forms, from being based on local incomes to being tied to a percentage of market rent. But how affordable is affordable? A limit of 80% of market rent in East Village Stratford (the Olympics site) is still out of reach of many local people. The Mayor’s new strategy of ‘genuinely affordable’ will aim to address this.

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Peter Murray

 

From our fascination with housing design to the impact of advances in domestic technology, the Twentieth Century Society’s autumn London lecture series will explore the way our built heritage has evolved over the last 100 years.

Focussing on what makes the C20 house so different, so special from what came before, the ‘Design for Living: The C20 House’ lecture series celebrates the publication of the C20 Society’s new book 100 Houses 100 Years, to which all the speakers contributed.

The lectures will be held at the Gallery, 70 Cowcross Street, London EC1M 6EJ, on Thursday evenings at 6.30pm. Tickets can be booked via the Twentieth Century’s website www.c20society.org.uk/events and cost £8.00 for C20 Society members, £10 non members, £5 students (includes a glass of wine). 

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