Currently showing blog posts for: September 2017 - . Go BACK to view all posts.
Peter Murray

Want to distinguish your Garden City from your City Garden? Want to learn how we went from Green Belt to Green Growth? The London Society’s Saturday Morning City Planning School is for you! Following on from this spring’s immensely successful Architecture School, this new series of talks seeks to provide an overview of how and why our cities have grown in the way they have, with a focus on London.

To find out more and to book for the whole series click here. To book individual talks, go to the events page.

We’ll explore the history of London’s development over the past 2000 years and its urban revival in the past quarter of a century. We’ll explain how decisions are made and how the idea of “affordable” housing, which dominates the media, has emerged over two centuries of debate to the viability-driven decision-making of today. Leading the course will be an expert line-up of speakers, from academia and practice, sharing their experience with an overview of how our city (and cities) have been managed over time and what the future holds.

Details of the five classes, which will be held in the Building Centre in Store Street, WC1 (in association with the Building Environment Trust), can be found here here. If you book the whole series of five, you’ll pay for just four, and non-members who book the whole series will receive a free 12-month membership of the Society.

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Peter Murray

 

The next meeting of the London Planning and Development Forum will be on Monday 25 September at UCL, 14 Upper Woburn Place, WC1H 0NN in the Peter Hall Room, Room G01, Ground Floor, Central House from 2.30 pm.

If you wish to attend, please contact the Secretary, Drummond Robson
robplan@btconnect.com

DISCUSSION TOPICS:
a. Discussion item 1: Draft Mayor’s Transport Strategy 2017
Led by Max Sugarman, the ICE London and South East England External Relations Executive and Mike Keegan and Paul Strang, of TfL

b. Discussion item 2; Esther Kurland of Urban Design London will update us on UDL’s activities and their new book: The Design Companion for Planning and Placemaking by TfL and UDL

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Peter Murray

 

Blue Badge Guide, David Thompson led a fascinating tour of one London’s best loved garden suburbs.

Read More…

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Peter Murray

 

journal of the building environment trustThe Building Environment Trust, the charity that runs the Building Centre in Store Street and provides education, information and inspiration about all aspects of the built environment through its very full programme of events, has published a magnificent looking journal, called BE:.

Wonderfully designed and illustrated, and completely free of ads, the journal is more of a coffee table book than it is a magazine. From real buildings and products to prototyped ideas, to inspiring drawings and wild imaginings … BE: assembles a productive crowd of people for you to meet and be inspired by.

Issue 1 includes:
– Exclusive William McDonough interview
– How to build with circular economy rules
– SuperMaterials
– Walter Stahel
– House study: made from rubbish
– Reimagining Ambridge
– Favourite food by Chris Wilkinson, Fuksas, Isay Weinfeld and many others…

You can buy a copy of the first issue, or subscribe to get the publication regularly, from the website here

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Peter Murray

 

The Institute of Historical Research with the Centre for Metropolitan history are running a project called Stray Voices which aims to stimulate insights into the buried stories of homeless men and women whose voices remain silent or unheeded within the historical record.

Can exploring the images and realities of vagrancy sharpen our understanding of ‘settled’ communities, which have otherwise been articulated from a sedentary perspective?

Involving specialists in the history of vagrancy, creative practitioners, community activists, members of the public and those who have experience of homelessness, the project will look at how history has shaped our preconceptions relating to those with ‘no fixed abode’.

As part of the project there will be series of participative events – including a two-day conference, a research-guided walk, and a forum theatre workshop – details of which can be found here.

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Peter Murray

 

I write this from Seoul where I am attending the inaugural Architecture Biennale. To be able to review the upcoming programme of the Society from the other side of the world allows a certain sense of detachment and reinforces one’s views of London’s unending fascination as a city of great historic complexity and contemporary change.
The autumn’s programme is a great reflection of this. The story of the great estate of the City of London, created from medieval land swaps, crumbling city walls and the dissolution of the Greater London Council, will be told by Michael Welbank, a former President of the Royal Town Planning Institute but also until recently Chief Commoner of the City Corporation, one of the most ancient of official posts. Victor Callister, who until he moved to the Design Council was responsible for the transformation of public spaces in the City, will take us on a walking tour to look at the complex area around Chancery Lane, its links with the Knights Templar and the Inns that contain it. And then there is the Banister Fletcher Lecture to be given by Loyd Grossman, a former architectural writer, guitarist, TV presenter, foodie, Chairman of NADFAS and the Royal Parks, he is also a member of the Court of the Worshipful Company of Art Scholars – which takes us back to the City of London and its ancient governance.
The U+I property company recently erected an artwork by Peter Liversidge on the front of its Victoria offices which in illuminated letters boldly states “Everything is connected”. London’s history can be traced not only through its physical fabric but the less tangible networks that are also part of our heritage as a city.
The full list of forthcoming events is available here.

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Peter Murray

 

A new independent silent film called London Symphony begins screening this week. It is a modern day ‘city symphony’, a genre of filmmaking that flourished in the 1920s, and consisted of films that attempted to build poetic portraits of city life.

Shot in black and white at over 300 locations around the capital and with an original soundtrack by the Convent Garden Sinfonia, it shows glimpses of the vibrance and diversity of Greater London and will be screened in over 35 venues around the UK from September 3rd. This includes three special events taking place amongst the diverse communities that inspired the production: at the Barbican Centre (on September 3rd), the Alexandra & Ainsworth Housing Estate (on September 17th), and the Shree Ghanapathy Temple in Wimbledon (on October 28th). These three events, which are supported by the Arts Council England, will include live performances of the soundtrack, as well as a panel discussion featuring the filmmakers and a local history expert unique to each venue.

The film was nominated for the Michael Powell Award for Best British Film at the Edinburgh International Film Festival 2017.

The London Society has secured some tickets for the London Symphony screening at Southwark Cathedral on 23 February. After the film there will be a Q+A with the director. More details here.

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Peter Murray

building environment trust logo

On Wednesday 20 September there is an evening lecture at the Building Centre in Store Street on two of London’s most iconic concrete developments: Centre Point and the White Collar Factory.

The lecture is part of The Concrete Centre’s 70 years of Concrete Quarterly exhibition programme, supported by the Built Environment Trust.

Gavin Miller, Partner at Rick Mather Architects, and Tim Bowder-Ridger, CEO and Senior Partner at Conran and Partners, will discuss Centre Point. The talk will present a preview of the remodelling and refurbishment of Centre Point tower, which has given the concrete icon a new lease of life.

Stephen Taylor, Associate Director of Allford Hall Monaghan Morris (AHMM), and Rob Partridge, Director of AKT II, will give an insight into the design and collaboration behind the newly completed White Collar Factory. The office development at City Road is a new concept in work place environment, featuring exposed concrete, core cooling and smart technology.

Tickets are free but booking is essential – click here for more details.

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