Currently showing blog posts for: January 2017 - . Go BACK to view all posts.
Peter Murray

 

pil100-january-2017-print-edPlanning in London, the journal of the London Planning and Development Forum, has reached its 100th edition. First published in 1992, it has grappled with the arguments, processes and nuances of the capital’s planning system for a quarter of a century, and still provides an interesting read for the professional and layman alike.

The current issue, which you can read online at this link, contains pieces by Nicholas Falk of URBED (the co author of the London Society’s recent white paper on west London), Simon Moody from the Environment Agency, and our very own Peter Murray.

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Peter Murray

In the first of a new series of pieces about London’s local and civic societies, Victor Keegan tells us about Westminster’s very own (and very active) residents’ group.

thorney island, early 1500sThe Thorney Island Society was formed in 1985 when it successfully saved from demolition London’s first public library in Great Smith Street, Westminster. We are named after the island formed by the meeting of the Tyburn and Thames on which Westminster Abbey, the ancient royal palace, Parliament and Westminster School stood. We believe this place is very special. The tiny area covered by Thorney Island arguably contains more “history” than any other comparable space in Britain and maybe anywhere.

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Peter Murray

RIBA is hosting an evening of “attempted stand-up comedy” with MC Steve Cross, to raise money for the RIBA Student Hardship Fund which helps to make architecture accessible to all.

Called How Did It End Up Like That?, the evening features a line-up of experts from across the world of architecture, from creators of iconic buildings, to people who train new architects and historians who try to understand how we ended up with the buildings and cities we have now.

It promises to be a night of learning cunningly disguised as a hilarious evening out! Tickets are available here,

Increasing numbers of architecture students are facing financial hardship continuing their studies. The RIBA provides grants to those students most in need through our Student Hardship Fund. The purposes of the RIBA Student Hardship Funds are to:

  • Alleviate financial hardship of students of architecture
  • Assist students financially in gaining professional experience
  • Widen participation in architectural education
  • Reduce student drop-out rates

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Peter Murray

 

830e1870-c236-4c76-b606-61b126d548bbThe Annual General Meeting of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on London’s Planning and Built Environment was held on Wednesday 11 January in Committee Room 11 at the Palace of Westminster. Rupa Huq MP was re-elected as Chair.

The APPG is supported by the London Society in cooperation with New London Architecture and Local Dialogue.

A full write-up of the meeting will be posted shortly and the minutes will be available to download. The meeting also heard from Max Farrell of Farrell’s and HTA’s Ben Derbyshire, who each gave a presentation on the challenges and opportunities for the capital, some of the key points of which are in the tweets below.

Corporate Supporters and Professional Members of the London Society receive invitations to each APPG (there will be at least three more this year). If you would like to keep up to date with the APPG’s discussions, sign up for our mailing list, or follow the Society on Twitter.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Peter Murray

 

logoWe all know that one of the best ways to see more of London is on foot, and that a guide-led walk can reveal many lesser-known aspects of the city.

That probably explains the popularity of the Walk London programme which has been organising free guided walks within the capital since 2007.

The walks, funded by Transport for London and delivered by Walk Unlimited, happen three times a year, in January, May and September. The next weekend takes place on the 28 and 29 January 2017.

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Peter Murray

 

LS-logo2Do you have time to edit the London Society blog?

We need someone to manage the day-to-day running of these pages. It’s not too onerous – soliciting contributions from relevant societies and individuals, rewriting the occasional press release for interesting events and exhibitions, getting in book reviews, posting the write-ups and photos from Society events.

It could take as little as a couple of hours a week, but there’s scope to do as much or as little as you feel able to commit.

Some copywriting or journalistic background would be useful, as would a working knowledge of WordPress.

It is, of course, purely voluntary. We will provide large amounts of gratitude and tickets to some of our events, but there’s no money in the coffers for either editors or contributors.

If you’re interested in helping or would like more information, please email director@londonsociety.org.uk and we can talk further.

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Peter Murray

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This is London

by Ben Judah

Reviewed by Louis Wilkins

Available from the London Society Book Service in association with John Sandoe Bookshop

[This review appeared in the Journal of the London Society, edition 470. More details here.]

Ben Judah’s eye-opening account of London’s hidden population of Roma beggars and street musicians, of West Indian cocaine dealers, Filipina maids, of pimps and prostitutes and African carers is a timely reminder of the changing make-up of the capital, its increasing levels of inequality as well as the wider pressures of economic migration which, Brexit or no, will continue to have a major impact on our economy and society.

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