Currently showing blog posts for: October 2016 - Page 2 of 2 - . Go BACK to view all posts.
Peter Murray

 

sadiq-khan-takes-first-mayor-question-time-e47runxgcs7lOrganised by London Planning Analyst, with Planning in London Magazine, and hosted by Colliers International, 50 George Street, London W1U 7GA.

London has a new mayor. Brexit is looming. Two factors that have an enormous impact on politics and policies in the capital. London Planning Analyst’s inaugral conference will focus on the strategic opportunities new Mayor Sadiq Khan should seize, and our speakers will argue for policy changes to deliver the homes and work spaces we need. A day-long conference for investors, developers, housebuilders, consultants, designers, planners, politicians and anyone interested in London’s future, focusing on the two main land uses in London – homes and workspace. The conference will include:

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Peter Murray

riba-crest

Did you know the Royal Institute of British Architects holds one of the largest architectural collections in the world? Please take the RIBA Collections Survey (which you can access here) to help the RIBA shape the future of this major architectural archive, and be in with a chance to win £50 of RIBA Bookshop tokens. (You do not need to have used the collections or visited the Library to take part). The survey closes on Sunday 30 October.

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Peter Murray

Lucian Smithers – Pocket’s Director of Marketing and Sales, and Russ Edwards, Head of Design, outlined ways in which Pocket hopes to address London’s ongoing housing crisis.

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Peter Murray

 

Alexandra Park and Palace Charitable Trust (APPCT) has launched a public fundraising campaign to support the restoration of its stunning Victorian Theatre, dating back to 1875, bringing it back to life for theatrical performances, cinema screenings, comedy and live music, and set to open its doors in 2018.

LONDON, ENGLAND - MAY 16: View of the Alexandra Palace Theatre auditorium looking towards the stage on May 16, 2014 in London, England. Alexandra Palace situated in the London Borough of Haringey First opened as "The People's Palace" in 1873. Just 16 days later a fire broke out in the Palace, burning it down in its entirety. On 2 November the world's first regular high-definition public television broadcast took place from the BBC studios at Alexandra Palace. In 1980 fire again burned a large part of the building, the Palace reopened in 1988. Recently awarded a Round 1 pass from The Heritage Lottery Fund the Palace plans to renovate parts of the derelict building including the BBC Studios and Victorian Theatre. (Photo by Miles Willis/Getty Images)

The Victorian Theatre, which, apart from the occasional one off event, has been closed to audiences for 80 years, is part of a larger East Wing Restoration Project which will transform the eastern end of Alexandra Palace into a new cultural destination, to rival the best on offer elsewhere, while doing justice to the building’s rich and eclectic history. It is part of a sustainable, long-term plan for Alexandra Palace which will see it achieve its full potential and safeguard it for future generations.

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Peter Murray

 

logoJoin The Academy of Urbanism on 16 November for Learning from Europe, where the finalists of the 2017 European City of the Year Award – Copenhagen, Eindhoven and Montpellier – will share lessons and learning on their past successes and future plans. Come along to discover how…

Copenhagen is co-creating a liveable, responsible city with an edge – flexible and creative distinctive and inclusive – to maintain its position as the “coolest kid on the Nordic block” (Lonely Planet).

Eindhoven has rebuilt its economy and its urban fabric by becoming a smart, strong and adaptive city with a horizontal society and a triple-helix collaboration in innovation.

Montpellier has installed a citizen-led administration to transcend political turbulence and exploit growth potential in a bi-polar city through a combination of grand projects and urban renewal.

The event will take place at U+I in Victoria, London. Learning from Europe begins at 3pm and will be followed by The Urbanism Awards celebrations in the evening. Be sure to stay and find out which of these three fascinating cities will be crowned European City of the Year.

Book online at: https://www.academyofurbanism.org.uk/events/2017-urbanism-awards/

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Peter Murray
Andrew Humphreys visits the Edward Ardizzone exhibition at the House of Illustration in Granary Square, King’s Cross.
image-from-little-tim-and-the-brave-sea-captain-estate-of-edward-ardizzone
In recent times, a bunch of artists from the mid 20th century who embody a kind of bucolic Englishness that has traditionally caused cosmopolitan critics to squirm uncomfortably, have been welcomed back into the fold. A mini publishing industry currently exists around the likes of Edward Bawden and Eric Ravilious. Now it’s the turn of Edward Ardizzone, thanks to a just opened show at London’s House of Illustration.
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Peter Murray

 

LS | BatterseaOn 20 September London Society members gathered to learn about the Battersea Power Station development and how its story fits with that of Nine Elms and London as a whole. Owen Hatherley (A Guide to the New Ruins of Great Britain, The Ministry of Nostalgia) and Peter Watts (Up in Smoke: The Failed Dreams of Battersea Power Station) talked us through its history, asking how its redevelopment will change Nine Elms, and the extent to which it is indicative of the play between property, power and politics in London today. Saul Collyns reports.

Watts’ motivation to delve deeper into the story of Battersea Power Station arose from a curiosity shared by many Londoners: Why had the numerous developments announced, seemingly on a two year cycle, never materialised, and what was going wrong?

Battersea Power Station, child of architect Giles Gilbert Scott (also known for structures such as Liverpool Cathedral and Waterloo Bridge), fully opened in 1935. According to Watts, its construction was more controversial than the Garden Bridge, with opponents including the Archbishop of Canterbury and the King. Throughout the 1960s it was notoriously known as a ‘polluting monster’, impregnating the surrounding area with sulphur smoke, the smell of which deterred locals from adjacent Battersea Park. Nevertheless, by the 1970s the power station had gained popularity, becoming the face of a ‘real’ and ‘authentic’ London, even appearing on the front cover of Pink Floyd’s album Animals.

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Peter Murray

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If you’re in full-time education you can become a student member of the London Society.

You’ll receive free tickets to at least six events a year and discounted rates for the others.

You will also be sent the London Society Journal twice a year.

Most importantly, you will be able to have your say in how London should develop by taking part in our debates, asking questions at talks and lectures, and submitting articles to the blog.

Student membership costs just £15. To join, enter your email address below and click ‘next’


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